Talents on Top of Europe, Berlin

Talents on Top of Europe, Berlin, 2007 participating parties

The unique cooperation model used in the political field by the countries around the Baltic Sea needs to be extended to the public-private sector in order to increase the competitiveness and attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region. This was one of the main conclusions reached by the leading representatives from business, government and research within the ICT and Life-Science at the seminar “Talents on Top of Europe” at the Nordic Embassies in Berlin on the 11th of June. Among the keynote speakers were: Danish Minister of Education, Bertel Haarder, President of the German Bundesrat and Minister President of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Dr. Harald Ringstorff, Senior Director of Siemens AG, Uwe Hermann.

Attraction of Talents

Europe cannot compete on natural resources, on cheap labour or at the detriment of its environment. Europe’s primary strength is knowledge and innovation. The Baltic Sea Region’s many active clusters have the potential to push further entrepreneurship and innovation, and constitute the Baltic Sea Region as on top of Europe in all senses.

Berlin city

A common challenge for the clusters is that bright scientific minds in the Region increasingly are moving to the USA lured by a dynamic entrepreneurial culture. In the same time China and India are entering the global economy with enormous investments in research and education.

The seminar Talents on Top of Europe focused on one of the most urgent regional challenges at present: Allocating talent in the Baltic Sea Region. It pinpointed two of the most important clusters: ICT and Life Science. In both of these areas, innovative and talented people are an essential factor for success.

It has through the years been stated that the Baltic Sea Region is a beacon to the rest of Europe; the economic growth is stronger and the level of skilled workforce is higher than in other peer regions, but the State of the Region Report 2006 also shows that “the Baltic Sea Region is doing well, but others are catching up”.
Adapting to the ever changing conditions will be one of the most important competition factors in the future. The key to adaptability is talented people and effective cluster policies and measures.

At the seminar Ole Frijs-Madsen stated:

Imagine that the Baltic Sea Region on Top of Europe has become a world famous area for innovation, science, competitiveness, environmental standards and quality of life. A laboratory like Silicon Valley is today – where tourists, investors, bright students and citizens all want to be.

Read/download the Director Ole Frijs-Madsen’s presentation at the Opening (Berlin, 11 June 2007).

Download speaker’s profiles.

Press Release – 11 June 2007

Ways out of Brain Drain for the Top of Europe

The unique cooperation model used in the political field by the countries around the Baltic Sea needs to be extended to the public-private sector in order to increase the competitiveness and attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region. This was one of the main conclusions reached by the leading representatives from business, government and research within the ICT and Life-Science at the seminar “Talents on Top of Europe” at the Nordic Embassies in Berlin today.

With the knowledge society demanding an ever increasingly skilled workforce and a steady stream of talented young people, the seminar, arranged in connection with Germany’s EU Presidency, highlighted key components necessary for the future success of northern Europe’s knowledge driven economies.

Dr. Harald Ringstorff, President of the German Bundesrat and Minister President of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, who was one of the seminar keynote speakers, stated that research and development in the Baltic Sea Region is ranking the highest in Europe. “To meet the world competition we need to improve our focus in four areas; financially to make the system strong, commercially to shorten the way from research to market, collaboration between countries and sectors, and better marketing of the Baltic Sea Region”, Dr. Ringstorff summarised.

Mr. Uwe Hermann from Siemens AG responded to a question about a possible German contribution to the already existing and well functioning Nordic-Baltic collaboration.

To Siemens the countries in the Baltic Sea Region were a white spot on the map just a few years ago. By now we have experienced the huge potential for Siemens, right in front of our own doorstep, especially in terms of the close and professional collaboration between the business and the university sectors.

World-class centres of excellence need to be developed through collaboration by the industry, universities and governments, strategically pooling the resources from throughout the Baltic Sea Region. The structures for such collaboration are stimulated by the Baltic Development Forum, and the first nuclei is being developed within the framework of ScanBalt,- Vice President of Novo Nordisk, Børge Diderichsen said.

It is time to create the synergy and coherence necessary to make the Baltic Sea Region the brain of Europe and a tool for its global development,- said Folke Snickars, Dean of the Swedish Royal Institute of Technology.

The Seminar was arranged by the Royal Danish Embassy in Berlin, ScanBalt, Baltic Development Forum, BioTop Berlin-Brandenburg, BioCon Valley and the Nordic Council of Ministers.

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